Stephen G. Cobb - Florida Criminal Defense Lawyer

Tampa Obstruction of Justice


Tampa Lawyer: Defining Obstruction Justice

Remember that little box of stuff that your weird Uncle Lou gave you? There was a funny little key in the box, one that you thought was cute to wear on a silver chain. Unfortunately, now you are being charged with obstruction of justice- you are shocked and curious about what else can be considered the same thing. Your first step should be to call a Tampa defense lawyer who can help you figure out how to defend against the original charge and can also let you know what else constitutes obstruction.

The little key that Uncle Lou gave to you was a handcuff key which can be obstruction of justice if you are concealing it. Your key defense to this charge might be that you were wearing it on a silver chain, meaning that it was not at any time concealed. The Tampa defense lawyer will point this out to the prosecutor who may have no choice but to end the case right there. Other possible ways to get charged with obstruction include:

  • Unlawful uses of police badges. Do not buy a badge and then walk around trying to pretend to be a policeman. (May also be called impersonating an officer)
  • Using the wrong color of lights on your vehicle
  • Depriving a police officer means of communication or protection. May become a more serious offense depending on circumstances.
  • Resisting an officer with or without violence to his person
  • Aiding escape
  • Refusing to aid a police officer, may potentially include failure to comply with direct order of a police officer as well.

A Tampa criminal defense lawyer will lay out the case and decide whether there is merit to it and how to best defend against the charge. Because obstruction charges can often come with other charges, it is likely that they will either be compounded or thrown out so that the prosecutor can focus on the more serious crimes instead.

Defense against some of the obstruction charges could include not knowing the action was a crime, which would work in the matter of the little silver key. If someone asks you to help him by holding open a door, you could be held liable if that person was a prisoner. If they are dressed in street clothes, you may have a viable defense for not knowing who they were, on the other hand if they have on a prison jumpsuit or shackles and you still hold open the door, you have less chance of getting anyone to buy the defense. Whatever your case may be, a Florida criminal law attorney will be able to assist and guide you.

Stephen G. Cobb, Esq.

Get your questions answered - call me for your free, 20 min phone consultation (850) 466-1522